Results tagged ‘ Giancarlo Stanton ’

STAT OF THE DAY (4/20 vs. SEA)

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With their early-season production, Adeiny Hechavarria and Marcell Ozuna have the Marlins jumping for joy.

One of the challenges for any major league manager early in a season is finding where certain players fit best in the batting order. Marlins skipper Mike Redmond has to be very encouraged by the opening-month production he’s seen from Marcell Ozuna hitting near the top of the lineup and from Adeiny Hechavarria near the bottom.

Ozuna, who launched a 3-run homer and matched his career best with 4 RBI in last night ‘a 7-0 win over the Mariners, has taken off since being inserted into the 2 hole, presumably in part because he’s seeing better pitches to hit batting in front of Giancarlo Stanton.

Ozuna hits 2nd against the Mariners this afternoon for the 5th consecutive game and for the 7th time in his last 8 starts after hitting 6th, 7th or 8th to begin the year.

While he’s not necessarily your prototypical 2-hole hitter, with his light-tower power and a propensity to strike out, the 23-year-old center fielder has batted .407 (11-for-27) with a 1.006 OPS out of the 2 spot. He has 2 doubles, a homer, 6 RBI and 7 runs scored in the 6 games.

As for Hechavarria, who had his 4th game of the season with at least 3 hits last night, we’ve seen him hit 1st, 2nd, 7th and 8th already this season. He’ll hit 6th for the first time this afternoon.

In 5 games batting in the top 2 spots, the Miami shortstop has hit just .227 (5-for-22) with a double, no walks and 2 runs scored.

In 13 games hitting 7th or 8th, the 25-year-old Hechavarria has batted .362 (17-for-47) with 3 doubles, 2 triples, 3 RBI, 4 walks and 9 runs scored.

Redmond has said on many occasions he envisions Hechavarria as a top-of-the-lineup table setter in the years ahead as he refine his approach at the plate. And the Marlins manager has also said Ozuna profiles as a long-term middle-of-the-order force with further seasoning.

But for now, both Hechavarria and Ozuna are flourishing in their current roles, both key contributors to an offense that ranks 2nd in the National League and 3rd in all of Baseball in runs scored.

That’s today’s Stat of the Day. To have the Stat of the Day delivered to you directly via e-mail, click the “Follow” button and enter your e-mail address.

The Marlins look to complete a 3-game sweep of the Mariners and close out a 4-2 homestand at 1:10 this afternoon. Our coverage on 940 WINZ and the Marlins Radio Network begins at 12:40 with Marlins On Deck. A full list of network affiliates—and information about how you can tune in online, on your mobile devices or via satellite radio–is located at http://glenngeffner.mlblogs.com/2014/03/13/hear-here-2/

For more on the Marlins and Major League Baseball, follow me on Twitter at @GlennGeffner and friend me on Facebook at Facebook.com/GlennGeffner. To have new Fish Tales posts and the Stat of the Day delivered directly to you via email, please click the “Follow” button and enter your email address. And you can catch Marlins play-by-play on the radio all season long on new flagship station AM 940 WINZ and the Marlins Radio Network.

STAT OF THE DAY (4/19 vs. SEA)

With his 2nd 5-RBI game in 3 games last night, Giancarlo Stanton ran his major league-leading RBI total to 26 through only 17 games. He knocked in 27 runs in his previous 3 Aprils in the big leagues combined (63 games).

Stanton drove in 2 runs on Opening Night, March 31, so technically, he has 24 RBI in April with 10 games remaining.

Stanton’s career high for RBI in a month is 30, set in May of 2012.

The major league record for RBI through the end of April (including any games that may have been played in March) is 36, set by Juan Gonzalez of the Rangers in 1998 and matched by Mark McGwire of the Cardinals in 1998.

The major league record for RBI solely in the month of April (not counting games played in March) is 35 by Gonzalez in ’98. The NL mark of 32 April RBI is shared by Barry Bonds with the Giants in 1996, McGwire in ’98 and Albert Pujols with the Cardinals in 2006.

The Marlins club record for RBI in April (and also through the end of April) is 30, set by Moises Alou in 1997.

The club high for RBI in any single month is 33, established by Hanley Ramirez in June of 2009.

In case you’re wondering, Giancarlo’s got a long way to go to run down the modern (post 1900) big league high for RBI in any calendar month. Yankees Hall of Famer Joe DiMaggio knocked in 53 runs in August of 1939. The modern NL record for RBI in a month is 47, set by New York Giants Hall of Famer Mel Ott in June of 1929.

And, as I Tweeted last night, with 26 RBI through only 17 games, Stanton is already 30 percent of the way to his full-season career high in RBI of 87, posted in 2011.

That’s today’s Stat of the Day. To have the Stat of the Day delivered to you directly via e-mail, click the “Follow” button and enter your e-mail address.

The Marlins and the Mariners continue their series tonight at 7:10. Our coverage on 940 WINZ and the Marlins Radio Network begins at 6:40 with Marlins On Deck. A full list of network affiliates—and information about how you can tune in online, on your mobile devices or via satellite radio–is located at http://glenngeffner.mlblogs.com/2014/03/13/hear-here-2/

For more on the Marlins and Major League Baseball, follow me on Twitter at @GlennGeffner and friend me on Facebook at Facebook.com/GlennGeffner. To have new Fish Tales posts and the Stat of the Day delivered directly to you via email, please click the “Follow” button and enter your email address. And you can catch Marlins play-by-play on the radio all season long on new flagship station AM 940 WINZ and the Marlins Radio Network.

UP…UP…AND A LOOOOOOONG WAY AWAY

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Giancarlo Stanton last night launched his 5th home run of the season, a first-inning 3-run shot off Stephen Strasburg, to ignite a 15-hit barrage as the Marlins beat the Nationals 11-2.

Last night’s Stanton home run was measured at 457 feet by ESPN Stats and Information Group’s Home Run Tracker Web site, which, because of the scientific methods it uses to measure home run distances is now regarded as the most trust-worthy source available for long ball information.

Stanton has now hit 3 of the 4 longest home runs in Baseball in 2014:

 

484 feet, Giancarlo Stanton, MIA, April 4 vs. SD

477 feet, Justin Upton, ATL, April 10 vs. NYM

469 feet, Giancarlo Stanton, MIA, 4/12 at PHI

457 feet, Giancarlo Stanton, MIA, 4/15 vs. WAS

453 feet, Buster Posey, SF, 3/31 at ARI

 

Among big leaguers with at least 3 home runs this season, Stanton’s average home run distance of 445.4 feet is easily the best in the game. Mike Napoli of the Red Sox is 2nd, with his 3 homers averaging 428.3 feet.

With 3 long balls in excess of 450 feet this season, Stanton has 18 career homers that have traveled at least that far.

The Stanton home run last night was the 122nd of his big league career, moving the 24-year-old into a tie with Gary Sheffield for 6th on the Marlins’ all-time home run list.

Stanton is only 32 homers behind Miami’s career leader Dan Uggla, who hit his 154 in 272 more games than Stanton’s played to date.

Here’s a look at who Giancarlo is chasing on the Marlins home run list:

 

1. Dan Uggla 154 HR in 776 G
2. Hanley Ramirez 148 HR in 943 G
3. Mike Lowell 143 HR in 981 G
4. Miguel Cabrera 138 HR in 720 G
5. Derrek Lee 129 HR in 844 G
6. Giancarlo Stanton 122 HR in 504 G
Gary Sheffield 122 HR in 558 G
8. Jeff Conine 120 in HR 1,014 G

For more on the Marlins and Major League Baseball, follow me on Twitter at @GlennGeffner and friend me on Facebook at Facebook.com/GlennGeffner. To have new Fish Tales posts and my Stat of the Day delivered directly to you via email, please click the “Follow” button and enter your email address. And you can catch Marlins play-by-play on the radio all season long on new flagship station AM 940 WINZ and the Marlins Radio Network.

EARLY REVIEWS: IT’S A HIT

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I’ll say it over and over again: It’s hard to draw too many definitive conclusions based on one week’s worth of ballgames, but there certainly are a lot of encouraging signs coming from the 2014 Marlins in the (very) early going.

Certainly the offense is deservedly getting the bulk of the attention, coming out of the season-opening homestand at or near the top of the majors in most categories after a dismal season in 2013.

Young and still developing returnees like Marcell Ozuna and Adeiny Hechavarria have gotten off to promising starts. Giancarlo Stanton is healthy and producing like a superstar. And newcomers like Casey McGehee and Jarrod Saltalamacchia have been huge upgrades over their predecessors.

But there’s another newcomer who I think deserves some recognition, new hitting coach Frank Menechino.

One of the things Frank talked about all spring was wanting to see Marlins hitters work the count better, put themselves into better hitting counts and, by running up pitch counts, force opposing starters out of the game earlier.

Through 7 games, the Marlins have executed this plan to near perfection. Near the top of the league in pitches seen, Miami hitters have taken advantage of good hitters counts, batting .381/.529/.635 when ahead in the count.

They’ve forced opposing starters out of the game after an average of just over 5 innings per start, pushing across 23 runs in 36.2 innings against starters.

When you force the starter out early, you get to the soft under-belly of most big league rosters, the long and middle relief corps. And Miami’s taken advantage there, hitting .344/.402/.467 against opposing bullpens.

While the Marlins have scored only 13 runs in innings 1-4 this season, they’ve scored 28 runs in innings 5-8, primarily against the opponents’ relief corps.

And the Marlins, who rank 2nd in the majors in runs scored behind the Rockies (who’ve played one more game), have also excelled so far in situational hitting, another huge emphasis for Menechino this spring. The Marlins are tied for 2nd in the majors in batting average with runners in scoring position (.333). They’re 3rd in the majors, hitting .389 with runners in scoring position and 2 outs. And they 2nd among the 30 clubs hitting .345 with men on base.

Wearing down opposing starters, pouncing on rival bullpens and cashing in on the bulk of their opportunities, this first week doesn’t guarantee anything over the long run, but it certainly marks a very promising beginning.

For more on the Marlins and Major League Baseball, follow me on Twitter at @GlennGeffner and friend me on Facebook at Facebook.com/GlennGeffner. To have new Fish Tales posts delivered directly to you via email, please click the “Follow” button and enter your email address. And you can catch Marlins play-by-play on the radio all season long on new flagship station AM 940 WINZ and the Marlins Radio Network.

MUSIC TO THEIR EARS

The single most-viewed blog I’ve posted in the short time I’ve done this on-and-off over the last few seasons was an April, 2012 post about player walk-up songs. 

As one who’s always wanted to give the people what they want, here’s a look at who’s walking up to what to begin the 2014 season.

Henderson Alvarez–Watch Out for This (Major Lazer)

Jeff Baker–Machinehead (Bush)

Steve Cishek–Send Me/Represent (116 Clique)

Derek Dietrich–In The Air Tonight (Phil Collins) That Power (wil.i.Am)

Greg Dobbs–Dark Horse (Katy Perry)

Mike Dunn–Bartholomew (The Silent Comedy)

Nathan Eovaldi–God’s Gonna Cut You Down (Johnny Cash)

Jose Fernandez–Se Compra Oro (Los 4) on Opening Night…changes nearly every start

Brad Hand–Wrecking Ball (Miley Cyrus)

Adeiny Hechavarria–Ambition (Wale)

Dan Jennings–Ooh Aah My Life Be Like (Grits)

Garrett Jones–Animal (Pearl Jam), Whiskey in a Jar (Metallica) and White Walls (Macklemore and Ryan Lewis)

Tom Koehler–Won’t Back Down (Eminem/Pink)

Casey McGehee–Simple Man (Shinedown)

Marcell Ozuna–Que Se Mueran de Envidia (Paramba), Yo La Queria Pila (Chimbala) and Siente El Ki (Los Lunatikos)

A.J. Ramos–Power (Kanye West)

Jarrod Saltalamacchia–All of the Lights (Kanye West)

Giancarlo Stanton–Clique re-mix (Kanye West) and Doin’ That (Clyde Carson)

Christian Yelich–Cameras (Drake)

Keep an ear out for a feature about player walk-up songs, how they’re chosen and the special meaning some hold, coming up on Marlins On Deck at some point in the next couple of weeks.

For more on the Marlins and Major League Baseball, follow me on Twitter at @GlennGeffner and friend me on Facebook at Facebook.com/GlennGeffner. To have new Fish Tales posts delivered directly to you via email, please click the “Follow” button and enter your email address. And you can catch Marlins play-by-play on the radio all season long on new flagship station AM 940 WINZ and the Marlins Radio Network.

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